Tom Lilley

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Tom Lilley

Personal information

Full name
Thomas Lilley

Date of birth
1900

Place of birth
Newbottle, Houghton-le-Spring, England

Date of death
1964

Playing position
Defender

Senior career*

Years
Team
Apps
(Gls)

1922–1923
Huddersfield Town
3
(0)

1923–1924
Nelson
14
(0)

1924–1926
Hartlepools United
60
(0)

1927–1928
Sunderland
1
(0)

1928–1930
St Mirren
?
(?)

1930–1931
Fulham
7
(0)

Total

85
(0)

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

Thomas “Tom” Lilley (1900–1964) was a professional footballer who played as a defender who played for Huddersfield Town, Nelson, Hartlepool United, Sunderland, St Mirren & Fulham.

This biographical article related to association football in England, about a defender born in the 1900s, is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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걸천사

Jeremy Deighton

Jeremy Deighton

Personal information

Full name
Jeremy Deighton

Date of birth
(1988-05-27) May 27, 1988 (age 28)

Place of birth
Broadview Heights, Ohio, United States

Height
6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)

Playing position
Forward

Youth career

2006–2009
Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania

Senior career*

Years
Team
Apps
(Gls)

2009
Erie Admirals

2010–2012
Pittsburgh Riverhounds
41
(11)

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of July 21, 2012.

Jeremy Deighton (born May 27, 1988 in Broadview Heights, Ohio) is an American soccer player.

Contents

1 Career

1.1 College and Amateur
1.2 Professional

2 References
3 External links

Career[edit]
College and Amateur[edit]
Deighton attended Saint Ignatius High School in Cleveland, Ohio where he was a three-year letter winner and a two-year starter for the No.1-ranked high school team in the nation. He was named his team’s Most Valuable Offensive Player as a senior in 2005, leading the team to the Ohio Division I, State and National championships.
Deighton was also a featured player on the SouthSide Bombers, a prominent indoor soccer club in the area. In the 2005-2006 season Deighton lead the team in goals pushing the squad to its first title over longtime rival “Friendly People Football Club” in the championship game. It is a widely believed notion that his time with the Bombers led to Deighton’s collegiate success paired along with his training with local soccer guru Nicolas Dipietro.
He subsequently played four years of college soccer at Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania, where he was named PSAC-West Player of the Year and earned first team All-PSAC and first team All-Region honors as a junior in 2008 and a senior in 2009.[1]
During his college years Deighton also played with the Erie Admirals in the National Premier Soccer League, helping the team to the 2009 NPSL Championship game.[2]
Professional[edit]
Deighton turned professional in 2010 when he signed for the Pittsburgh Riverhounds of the USL Second Division.[3] He made his professional debut on April 17, 2010 in the team’s 2010 season opener against the Real Maryland Monarchs,[4] and scored his first professional goal on May 15, 2010 in a 2-1 loss to Charleston Battery.[5]
References[edit]

^ Kyle Loughlin and Jeremy Deighton Named PSAC Men’s Soccer Athletes of the Year
^ Erie Admirals advance to NPSL Championship
^ Deighton inks professional deal with
서양야동

Lesser fish eagle

Lesser fish eagle

Conservation status

Near Threatened (IUCN 3.1)[1]

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Animalia

Phylum:
Chordata

Class:
Aves

Order:
Accipitriformes

Family:
Accipitridae

Genus:
Ichthyophaga

Species:
I. humilis

Binomial name

Ichthyophaga humilis
(Müller,S & Schlegel, 1841)

The lesser fish eagle (Ichthyophaga humilis) is a species of Ichthyophaga found in the Indian subcontinent, primarily in the foothills of the Himalayas, and south-east Asia. There have been some stray reports from Gujarat and Central India and in more recent times from the Kaveri river valley in southern India.[citation needed] The distribution in southern India is not yet confirmed.
Lesser fish eagles are fish-eating birds that have feet adapted to aid in gripping slippery fish. They have strongly curved talons,[2] and spicules along the underside of the birds’ toes help to grip fish as they pull them from the water.[3]
There are two subspecies: Ichthyophaga humilis humilis, which is native to the Malaysian Peninsula, Sumatra, Borneo, and Sulawesi;[2] and Ichthyophaga humilis plumbea, which is native to Kashmir through southeast India, Nepal, and Burma towards Indochina.[2]

Contents

1 Description
2 Diet and feeding habits
3 Habitat
4 Range
5 Reproduction
6 References

Description[edit]

Lesser fish eagle on the banks of river Kaveri, India

The lesser fish eagle is a medium-sized bird of prey that is primarily gray-brown in colour with broad, blunt wings and coarse featherless legs.[4] They are smaller than the similar Ichthyophaga ichthyaetus (gray-headed fish eagle)[5] and may often get confused with the similar species. The lesser fish eagle has a brown breast with white thighs and belly.[3] They have a short, rounded tail with a long neck and a small head.[5] Juvenile lesser fish eagles are similar in appearance to adults, although they have brown eyes whereas an adult has yellow. Adults have a wingspan reaching 1.2 m and can grow to up to 64 centimeters tall.[3]
Diet and feeding habits[edit]
The lesser fish eagle feeds primarily on fish, which it snatches from the water as it observes them from above on a perch, which may be an overhanging tree or rock in the middle of a stream.[2] They have several personal perches that they often switch between throughout their feeding time.[3] As their diet is primarily fish, lesser fish eagles have large, curved talons specialized for catching fish and taking t
19금

Negri River

This article is about Negri River in Romania.. For Negri River in Australia, see Negri River (Australia).

Negri River

River

Countries
Romania

Counties
Caraş-Severin County

Tributaries

 - left
Valea Lupului

Source

 - location
Poiana Ruscă Mountains

Mouth
Lozna

The Negri River is a tributary of the Lozna River in Romania.
References[edit]

Administrația Națională Apelor Române – Cadastrul Apelor – București
Institutul de Meteorologie și Hidrologie – Rîurile României – București 1971

Maps[edit]

Harta Munții Poiana Rusca [1]
Harta Județului Caraș-Severin [2]

This article related to a river in Caraș-Severin County is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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걸천사

Chuta Formation

Chuta Formation
Stratigraphic range: Cretaceous

Type
Formation

Location

Country
Mexico

The Chuta Formation is a geologic formation in Mexico. It preserves fossils dating back to the Cretaceous period.
See also[edit]

Earth sciences portal
Mexico portal
Paleontology portal
Cretaceous portal
Mesozoic portal

List of fossiliferous stratigraphic units in Mexico

References[edit]

Various Contributors to the Paleobiology Database. “Fossilworks: Gateway to the Paleobiology Database”. Retrieved 8 July 2014. 

This article about a specific stratigraphic formation in Mexico is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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미소넷

South American Basketball Championship for Women

South American Basketball Championship for Women

Most recent season or competition:
2016 South American Basketball Championship for Women

Sport
Basketball

Founded
1946

Inaugural season
1946

No. of teams
10

Country
South America

Continent
South America

Most recent
champion(s)
 Brazil

Most titles
 Brazil (26)

Related
competitions
FIBA Americas Championship for Women

Official website
Fibaamericas.com

South American Basketball Championship for Women was first played in 1946.[1] Female teams from South America take part in this tournament, which often has been played biannually.

Contents

1 Summaries
2 Performances by nation
3 See also
4 References
5 External links

Summaries[edit]

Year
Host
Gold
Silver
Bronze

1946
 Chile (Santiago)
 Chile
 Brazil
 Argentina

1948
 Argentina (Buenos Aires)
 Argentina
 Chile
 Peru

1950
 Peru (Lima)
 Chile
 Argentina
 Peru

1952
 Paraguay (Asunción)
 Paraguay
 Brazil
 Chile

1954
 Brazil (São Paulo)
 Brazil
 Chile
 Ecuador

1956
 Ecuador (Quito)
 Chile
 Paraguay
 Brazil

1958
 Peru (Lima)
 Brazil
 Argentina
 Paraguay

1960
 Chile (Santiago)
 Chile
 Brazil
 Peru

1962
 Paraguay (Asunción)
 Paraguay
 Chile
 Brazil

1965
 Brazil (Rio de Janeiro)
 Brazil
 Paraguay
 Peru

1967
 Colombia (Cali)
 Brazil
 Chile
 Peru

1968
 Chile (Santiago)
 Brazil
 Chile
 Argentina

1970
 Ecuador (Guayaquil)
 Brazil
 Argentina
 Ecuador

1972
 Peru (Lima)
 Brazil
 Peru
 Paraguay

1974
 Bolivia (La Paz)
 Brazil
 Argentina
 Bolivia

1977
 Peru (Lima)
 Peru
 Brazil
 Argentina

1978
 Bolivia (La Paz)
 Brazil
 Bolivia
 Argentina

1981
 Peru (Lima)
 Brazil
 Peru
 Colombia

1984
 Colombia (Cúcuta)
 Colombia
 Brazil
 Peru

1986
 Brazil (Guaratinguetá)
 Brazil
 Peru
 Colombia

1989
 Chile (Santiago)
 Brazil
 Peru
 Argentina

1991
 Colombia (Bogotá)
 Brazil
 Colombia
 Argentina

1993
 Bolivia (Cochabamba)
 Brazil
 Argentina
 Chile

1995
 Brazil (Jacareí)
 Brazil
 Argentina
 Chile

1997
 Chile (Iquique)
 Brazi
입싸

Parachela maculicauda

Parachela maculicauda

Conservation status

Least Concern (IUCN 3.1)

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Animalia

Phylum:
Chordata

Class:
Actinopterygii

Order:
Cypriniformes

Family:
Cyprinidae

Genus:
Parachela

Species:
P. maculicauda

Binomial name

Parachela maculicauda
(Smith, 1934)

Parachela maculicauda is a freshwater fish in the genus Parachela, family Cyprinidae and order Cypriniformes. It occurs in lowland rivers and swamps in small groups. Found at the water surface in small and medium-sized rivers with nearby areas of floodplain forest. Feeds on plankton.[1]
References[edit]

^ Rainboth, Walter J. Fishes of the Cambodian Mekong. Food & Agriculture Org., 1996.

This Cyprinidae-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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우리넷

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis

Synonyms
degenerative arthritis, degenerative joint disease, osteoarthrosis

The formation of hard nobs at the middle finger joints (known as Bouchard’s nodes) and at the farther away finger joint (known as Heberden’s node) are a common feature of osteoarthritis in the hands.

Classification and external resources

Specialty
Rheumatology, orthopedics

ICD-10
M15-M19, M47

ICD-9-CM
715

OMIM
165720

DiseasesDB
9313

MedlinePlus
000423

eMedicine
med/1682 orthoped/427 pmr/93 radio/492

Patient UK
Osteoarthritis

MeSH
D010003

[edit on Wikidata]

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a type of joint disease that results from breakdown of joint cartilage and underlying bone.[1] The most common symptoms are joint pain and stiffness. Initially, symptoms may occur only following exercise, but over time may become constant. Other symptoms may include joint swelling, decreased range of motion, and when the back is affected weakness or numbness of the arms and legs. The most commonly involved joints are those near the ends of the fingers, at the base of the thumb, neck, lower back, knee, and hips. Joints on one side of the body are often more affected than those on the other. Usually the symptoms come on over years. It can affect work and normal daily activities. Unlike other types of arthritis, only the joints are typically affected.[2]
Causes include previous joint injury, abnormal joint or limb development, and inherited factors. Risk is greater in those who are overweight, have one leg of a different length, and have jobs that result in high levels of joint stress.[2][3] Osteoarthritis is believed to be caused by mechanical stress on the joint and low grade inflammatory processes.[4] It develops as cartilage is lost and the underlying bone becomes affected.[2] As pain may make it difficult to exercise, muscle loss may occur.[3][5] Diagnosis is typically based on signs and symptoms, with medical imaging and other tests occasionally used to either support or rule out other problems. In contrast to rheumatoid arthritis, which is primarily an inflammatory condition, in osteoarthritis, the joints do not typically become hot or red.[2]
Treatment includes exercise, efforts to decrease joint stress, support groups, and pain medications.[2][6] Efforts to decrease joint stress include resting and the use of a cane. Weight loss may help in those who are overweight. Pain medications may include paracetamol (acetaminophen) as well as NSAIDs such as napr
19곰

Luena, Cantabria

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Luena

Municipality

Entrambasmestas village, Luena.

Location of Luena

Luena

Location in Spain

Coordinates: 43°5′45″N 3°54′1″W / 43.09583°N 3.90028°W / 43.09583; -3.90028Coordinates: 43°5′45″N 3°54′1″W / 43.09583°N 3.90028°W / 43.09583; -3.90028

Country
 Spain

Autonomous community
 Cantabria

Province
Cantabria

Comarca
Pas and Miera valleys

Judicial district
Medio Cudeyo

Capital
San Miguel de Luena

Government

 • Alcalde
José Ángel Ruiz Gómez (2007) (PRC)

Area

 • Total
90.54 km2 (34.96 sq mi)

Elevation
457 m (1,499 ft)

Population (2008)

 • Total
758

 • Density
8.4/km2 (22/sq mi)

Time zone
CET (UTC+1)

 • Summer (DST)
CEST (UTC+2)

Luena is a municipality located in the autonomous community of Cantabria, Spain. According to the 2007 census, the municipality has a population of 831 inhabitants. Its capital is San Miguel de Luena. The municipality consists of a valley which runs from the Cantabrian Mountains to the North, until it reaches the valley of the river Pas. It is a markedly rural area, where the traditional economic activity evolves around the cow.
Towns[edit]

Bollacín
Bustasur
Carrascal de Cocejón
Carrascal de San Miguel
Cazpurrión
El Cocejón
Entrambasmestas
La Garma
Llano
Los Pandos
Pandoto
La Parada
Penilla
La Puente
Resconorio
Retuerta
San Andrés de Luena
San Miguel de Luena (capital)
Sel de la Carrera
Sel de la Peña
Sel del Hoyo
Sel del Manzano
Selviejo
Tablado
Urdiales
Vega Escobosa
La Ventona
Vozpornoche

External links[edit]

Luena – Cantabria 102 Municipios

House in Selviejo village, Luena.

Livestock in the Luena Valley.

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Municipalities of Cantabria

Alfoz de Lloredo
Ampuero
Anievas
Arenas de Iguña
Argoños
Arnuero
Arredondo
El Astillero
Bárcena de Cicero
Bárcena de Pie de Concha
Bareyo
Cabezón de la Sal
Cabezón de Liébana
Cabuérniga
Camaleño
Camargo
Campoo de Enmedio
Campoo de Yuso
Cartes
Castañeda
Castro Urdiales
Celis
Cieza
Cillorigo de Liébana
Colindres
Comillas
Los Corrales de Buelna
Corvera de Toranzo
Entrambasaguas
Escalante
Guriezo
Hazas de Cesto
Hermandad
걸천사