Cambridge Lawns

Cambridge Lawns is a residential neighborhood of single-family homes near the University of Miami and joined by proximity and a common front onto tree-lined Broad Canal [1] (a.k.a. Brewer Canal), a waterway of the City of South Miami in Miami-Dade County, Florida.
The neighborhood includes the Cambridge Lawns Historic District [2] and adjacent homes in the Cambridge Lawns subdivision and is generally defined on the west by Brewer Park [3] and the widening of the Broad Canal, also known as Brewer Canal; on the east by SW 60th Avenue; on the north by Miller Drive; and, on the south by SW 58th Street to the west of 62nd Avenue and the Broad Canal to the east of 62nd Avenue.[4]
Originally developed in the mid-1920s just 0.7 miles from the newly chartered University of Miami, the Cambridge Lawns neighborhood was given a ‘university’ theme from the outset by developers. With the college lawns and riverside parks at Cambridge University in England in mind, developers projected a waterfront park and tree-lined canal with adjacent suburban lawns, while the neighborhood’s first street names were dubbed in honor of well-known U.S. universities—SW 57th Street was then called “Harvard Avenue,” for example, while SW 57th Drive was “Princeton Boulevard” and SW 58th Street was originally named “Clemson Avenue.”[5]
By 1928, developers had completed 30 of the first homes in the neighborhood’s signature Tudor Revival (or Mock Tudor) and Mediterranean Revival Style architecture, marking what today is known as the Cambridge Lawns Historic District. These homes, which received their historic designation in 2005, are still referred to by many as “cottages,” owing to their modest lot and construction size. The Tudor Revival homes are generally 1½ stories, noteworthy for their gabled facades and chimneys, while the Mediterranean Revival homes have textured or smooth stucco surfaces, ornamental window and door frames and barrel-tile roofs.
The Great Miami Hurricane of 1926 brought an end to the 1920s South Florida real estate boom, while the Great Depression and World War II would keep the local real estate market depressed for more than two decades. The post-war return to prosperity saw student enrollment at the University of Miami climb above 10,000 and with the area ripe for new homes for professors, administrative staff and baby-boom families, developers launched a second phase of homebuilding on larger lots in the Cambridge Lawns subdivision to the south of Broa
초대남

Chris Johns (photographer)

Chris Johns (born April 15, 1951)[1] is a photographer who was the editor-in-chief for National Geographic Magazine from January 2005 to April 2014. After a reorganization, in April 2014, Johns was named chief content officer of National Geographic Magazine.[2] He spent many years in Africa for the magazine and is the first photographer to have been named its editor-in-chief. He started his journalism career at daily newspapers.
Biography[edit]
Born in Medford, Oregon, Johns studied technical journalism at Oregon State University and photojournalism at the University of Minnesota.[3] Johns began his photography career as a staff member at The Topeka Capital-Journal (where he and Gerald Ford’s daughter Susan Ford were the paper’s two interns in 1975).[4] He was named Newspaper Photographer of the Year by the National Press Photographers Association in 1979 at age 28, and became a staff photographer at the Seattle Times in 1980.[5] After joining National Geographic, he contributed extensively, shooting two cover articles before becoming an editor.
Johns has photographed extensively in Africa. The foreword to Johns’ photography book Valley of Life: Africa’s Great Rift was written by Nelson Mandela.
Johns was named Editor of the Year in October 2008 by Advertising Age magazine at the American Magazine Conference. During his tenure as its editor-in-chief, National Geographic twice received the General Excellence prize in the National Magazine Awards (in 2007 and 2008).[6]
Johns was awarded an Honorary Doctorate from Indiana University Bloomington in 2009.
He lives in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia with his wife Elizabeth, his daughters Noel and Louise, and his son Tim.
References[edit]

^ Murg, Stephanie (April 30, 2008). “ELLIES 2008: SO WHAT DO YOU DO, CHRIS JOHNS, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF OF NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC?”. Mediabistro. Retrieved December 25, 2014. 
^ http://press.nationalgeographic.com/2014/04/30/reorganizes-publishing-television-operations-new-roles-chief-content-officer/
^ Nation Geographic. “Photography Chris Johns”. photography.nationalgeographic.com. Nation Geographic. Retrieved 4 March 2016. 
^ Ford’s daughter Susan interned at C-J – Topeka Capital-Journal – December 28, 2006
^ Garlock, David (2003). Pulitzer Prize Feature Stories: America’s Best Writing, 1978-2003. Ames, Iowa: Iowa State Press. p. 180. ISBN 0-8138-2545-8. 
^ “National Geographic Wins 3 Awards, Honored Beyond Photography” (New York Times, May 2, 2008).

봉지닷컴

OptaPlanner

OptaPlanner

Developer(s)
Red Hat

Stable release

6.5.0.Final / October 20, 2016; 2 months ago (2016-10-20)

Written in
Java

Operating system
Cross-platform

Type
Mathematical optimization

License
ASL 2

Website
http://www.optaplanner.org/

OptaPlanner is mathematical optimization software. It solves constraint satisfaction problems with construction heuristic and metaheuristic algorithms. It’s professional Open Source, sponsored by Red Hat.
KIE (Knowledge Is Everything) is the new umbrella name for OptaPlanner, Drools, jBPM, UberFire and related technologies.
History[edit]
It was founded by Geoffrey De Smet in 2006 under the name Taseree. In 2007, it joined the Drools project as Drools Solver. In 2009 it renamed to Drools Planner. In March 2013, it graduated from Drools project and finally renamed to OptaPlanner.
Red Hat’s BRMS subscription offering includes full support for OptaPlanner under the name JBoss Business Resource Planner. First, between March 2014 and March 2015, BRMS and BPM Suite 6.0 included it as tech preview. As of April 2015, Red Hat’s BRMS and BPM Suite 6.1 and higher include it as full support.
Research competitions results[edit]
OptaPlanner contributors regularly compete against academic researchers in research competitions. Their results include:

ICON challenge 2014: 2nd place.
International Timetabling Competition 2007: 4th place on track 1.

External links[edit]

OptaPlanner homepage

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Mathematical optimization software

Data formats

LP
MPS
nl
OptML
OSiL
sol
xMPS

Modeling tools

AIMMS
AMPL
APMonitor
CMPL
CVX
CVXOPT
CVXPY
ECLiPSe-CLP
GAMS
GNU MathProg
JuMP
LINDO
OPL
MPL
OptimJ
PICOS
PuLP
Pyomo
ROML
TOMLAB
Xpress-Mosel
YALMIP
ZIMPL

LP, MILP∗ solvers

ABACUS∗
APOPT∗
Artelys Knitro∗
BCP∗
BDMLP
BPMPD
BPOPT
CLP
CBC∗
CPLEX∗
CSDP
DSDP
FortMP∗
GCG∗
GIPALS32
GLPK/GLPSOL∗
Gurobi∗
HOPDM
LINDO∗
lp_solve∗
LOQO
MINOS
MINTO∗
MOSEK∗
OOPS
OOQP
PCx
QSopt
SAS/OR∗
SCIP∗
SoPlex
SOPT-IP∗
Sulum Optimization Tools∗
SYMPHONY∗
XA∗
Xpress-Optimizer∗

QP, MIQP∗ solvers

APOPT∗
Artelys Knitro∗
BPMPD
BPOPT
BQPD
CBC∗
CLP
CPLEX∗
FortMP∗
GloMIQO∗
Gurobi∗
IPOPT
LINDO∗
LSSOL
LOQO
MINOS
MOSEK∗
OOPS
OOQP
QPOPT
QPSOL
SCIP∗
XA Quadratic Solver
Xpress-Optimizer∗

QCP, MIQCP∗ solvers

APOPT∗
Artelys Knitro∗
BPMPD
BPOPT
CPLEX∗
GloMIQO∗
Gurobi∗
IPOPT
LINDO∗
LOQO
MINOS
MOSEK∗
SCIP∗
Xpress-Optimizer∗
Xpr
포토툰

Villanueva del Conde

Villanueva del Conde is a village and municipality in the province of Salamanca, western Spain, part of the autonomous community of Castile-Leon. It is located 78 kilometres from the provincial capital city of Salamanca and has a population of 251 people.
Geography[edit]
The municipality covers an area of 12.99 km².
It lies 801 metres above sea level.
The post code is 37658
List of municipalities in Salamanca
Coordinates: 40°31′N 6°00′W / 40.517°N 6.000°W / 40.517; -6.000

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Municipalities in the province of Salamanca

Abusejo
Agallas
Ahigal de Villarino
Ahigal de los Aceiteros
Alaraz
Alba de Tormes
Alba de Yeltes
Alconada
Aldea del Obispo
Aldeacipreste
Aldeadávila de la Ribera
Aldealengua
Aldeanueva de Figueroa
Aldeanueva de la Sierra
Aldearrodrigo
Aldearrubia
Aldeaseca de Alba
Aldeaseca de la Frontera
Aldeatejada
Aldeavieja de Tormes
Aldehuela de Yeltes
Aldehuela de la Bóveda
Almenara de Tormes
Almendra
Anaya de Alba
Arabayona de Mógica
Arapiles
Arcediano
Armenteros
Añover de Tormes
Babilafuente
Barbadillo
Barbalos
Barceo
Barruecopardo
Bañobárez
Beleña
Bermellar
Berrocal de Huebra
Berrocal de Salvatierra
Boada
Bogajo
Brincones
Buenamadre
Buenavista
Béjar
Bóveda del Río Almar
Cabeza del Caballo
Cabezabellosa de la Calzada
Cabrerizos
Cabrillas
Calvarrasa de Abajo
Calvarrasa de Arriba
Calzada de Don Diego
Calzada de Valdunciel
Campillo de Azaba
Candelario
Canillas de Abajo
Cantagallo
Cantalapiedra
Cantalpino
Cantaracillo
Carbajosa de la Sagrada
Carpio de Azaba
Carrascal de Barregas
Carrascal del Obispo
Casafranca
Casillas de Flores
Castellanos de Moriscos
Castellanos de Villiquera
Castillejo de Martín Viejo
Castraz
Cepeda
Cereceda de la Sierra
Cerezal de Peñahorcada
Cerralbo
Cespedosa de Tormes
Chagarcía Medianero
Cilleros de la Bastida
Cipérez
Ciudad Rodrigo
Coca de Alba
Colmenar de Montemayor
Cordovilla
Cristóbal de la Sierra
Dios le Guarde
Doñinos de Ledesma
Doñinos de Salamanca
Ejeme
El Arco
El Bodón
El Cabaco
El Campo de Peñaranda
El Cerro
El Cubo de Don Sancho
El Manzano
El Maíllo
El Milano
El Payo
El Pedroso de la Armuña
El Pino de Tormes
El Sahugo
El Tejado
El Tornadizo
Encina de San Silvestre
Encinas de Abajo
Encinas de Arriba
Encinasola de los Comendadores
Endrinal
Escurial de la Sierra
Espadaña
Espeja
Espino de la Orbada
Florida de Liébana
Forfoleda
Frades de la Sierra
Fresnedoso
Fresno Alhándiga
Fuenteguinaldo
Fuenteliante
Fuenterroble de Salvatierra
Fuentes de Béjar
Fuentes de Oño
섹스

Noumeroi

The Noumeroi (Greek: [οἱ ] Νούμεροι, masculine plural) or Noumera ([τὰ] Nούμερα, neuter plural, from the Latin numerus, “number” in the sense of “regiment”) were a Byzantine infantry garrison unit for the imperial capital, Constantinople. Their main task involved the protection of the Great Palace of Constantinople and of the Noumera, one of the city’s prisons.

Contents

1 History and functions
2 Command structure
3 References
4 Sources

History and functions[edit]
The origin and date of establishment of the Noumeroi is unknown.[1] They are first securely attested during the reign of Michael III (r. 842–867): the unit is mentioned in the Taktikon Uspensky of 842/843, and the name of one of its commanders, Leo Lalakon, also survives from the same period.[1][2][3] J.B. Bury considered a seal of the 7th–8th centuries mentioning a “droungarios tou nou[merou?]” as an indication of a predecessor of the 9th-century unit, and based on the nomenclature of its subaltern officers hypothesized an origin in the East Roman army of the 6th century,[4] while John Haldon traces its hypothetical lineage to the late 7th century.[3] The unit survived until the 11th century, when it ceases to be mentioned, indicating that it was dissolved.[3][5]
The precise title of this unit remains uncertain. In Byzantine literature it is documented only in the genitive plural (τῶν Νουμέρων), which leaves unclear whether the unit title was Noumeroi (Νούμεροι) or Noumera (Νούμερα). Modern scholars over the past century have variously favoured both forms.[6] The term noumeros (transliterated from Latin: numerus, in Greek also translated as arithmos) was itself a common term for a regular military unit of indeterminate size used in Late Antiquity.[7] It was only later, in the 8th and possibly even in the 9th century, that the name came to specify this particular unit.[8] The regiment in turn gave its name to the Noumera, a building adjoining the Hippodrome of Constantinople that served as their barracks and as a city prison. The French scholar Rodolphe Guilland identified the 9th-century Noumera with the prison known as Prandiara in earlier times.[2][9]
The Noumeroi ranked among the imperial tagmata, professional regiments stationed in and around Constantinople.[10] Unlike most of the tagmata, the Noumeroi were composed of infantry and never left Constantinople, being entrusted with guard duties in the city,[11] specifically watching over
19곰

Saint-Zénon, Quebec

Not to be confused with Saint-Zénon-du-Lac-Humqui, Quebec, in the Bas-Saint-Laurent region

Saint-Zénon

Municipality

Location within Matawinie RCM.

Saint-Zénon

Location in central Quebec.

Coordinates: 46°33′N 73°49′W / 46.550°N 73.817°W / 46.550; -73.817Coordinates: 46°33′N 73°49′W / 46.550°N 73.817°W / 46.550; -73.817[1]

Country
 Canada

Province
 Quebec

Region
Lanaudière

RCM
Matawinie

Constituted
October 7, 1895

Government[2]

 • Mayor
Eddy St-Georges

 • Federal riding
Joliette

 • Prov. riding
Berthier

Area[2][3]

 • Total
492.20 km2 (190.04 sq mi)

 • Land
465.07 km2 (179.56 sq mi)

Population (2011)[4]

 • Total
1,250

 • Density
2.7/km2 (7/sq mi)

 • Pop 2006-2011
9.4%

 • Dwellings
1,229

Time zone
EST (UTC−5)

 • Summer (DST)
EDT (UTC−4)

Postal code(s)
J0K 3N0

Area code(s)
450 and 579

Highways
Route 131

Website
www.st-zenon.org

Saint-Zénon is a municipality in the Lanaudière region of Quebec, Canada, part of the Matawinie Regional County Municipality.

Contents

1 Demographics

1.1 Population
1.2 Language

2 See also
3 References

Demographics[edit]
Population[edit]
In the 2011 Census, Statistics Canada originally reported that Saint-Zénon had a population of 1,115 living in 551 of its 180 total dwellings, an 8.2% change from its 2006 population of 1,379.[5] Statistics Canada subsequently amended the 2011 census results to a population of 1,250 living in 619 of its 1,229 total dwellings, a -9.4% change from 2006.[4] With a land area of 465.07 km2 (179.56 sq mi), it had a population density of 2.688/km2 (6.961/sq mi) in 2011.[4][5]

Historical Census Data – Saint-Zénon, Quebec[6]

Year
Pop.
±%

1991
1,067
—    

1996
1,146
+7.4%

Year
Pop.
±%

2001
1,180
+3.0%

2006
1,379
+16.9%

Year
Pop.
±%

2011
1,250
−9.4%

Language[edit]
Mother tongue:[7]

English as first language: 0.7%
French as first language: 96.0%
English and French as first language: 2.6%
Other as first language: 0.7%

See also[edit]

List of municipalities in Quebec

References[edit]

^ Reference number 349159 of the Commission de toponymie du Québec (French)
^ a b Geographic code 62080 in the official Répertoire des municipalités (Fre
웹툰

The Will to Kill

This article does not cite any sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (June 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

The Will to Kill

Studio album by Malevolent Creation

Released
November 11, 2002

Recorded
Mana Studio, Tampa

Genre
Death metal

Length
41:33

Label
Arctic Music, Nuclear Blast

Producer
Malevolent Creation

Malevolent Creation chronology

Envenomed
(2000)
The Will to Kill
(2000)
Warkult
(2004)

The Will to Kill is the eighth studio album by Florida death metal band Malevolent Creation. The U.S. and UK album covers are alternate.
Track listing[edit]

No.
Title
Lyrics
Music
Length

1.
“The Will to Kill”  
Kyle Symons
Phil Fasciana
3:58

2.
“Pillage and Burn”  
Rob Barrett
Rob Barrett
2:21

3.
“All That Remains”  
Symons
Fasciana
3:55

4.
“With Murderous Precision”  
Symons
Fasciana
3:49

5.
“Lifeblood”  
Symons
Fasciana
3:31

6.
“Assassin Squad”  
Barrett
Barrett
3:05

7.
“Rebirth of Terror”  
Symons
Fasciana
3:34

8.
“Superior Firepower”  
Barrett
Fasciana, Barrett, Gordon Simms
3:34

9.
“Divide and Conquer”  
Symons
Fasciana
4:58

10.
“The Cardinal’s Law”  
Symons
Fasciana
5:18

11.
“Burnt Beyond Recognition”  
Barrett
Barrett
3:30

Total length:
41:33

Personnel[edit]

Malevolent Creation

Kyle Symons – Vocals
Rob Barrett – Lead guitar
Phil Fasciana – Rhythm guitar
Gordon Simms – Bass
Justin DiPinto – Drums

Additional musician(s)

James Murphy – Guitar solo on “Assassin Squad”
Shawn Ohtani – Guitar solo on “All That Remains”

Production

Jean-Francois Dagenais – Mixing
Shawn Ohtani – Engineering
Travis Smith – Cover art
Robert Cardenas – Layout

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Malevolent Creation

Brett Hoffman
Jon Rubin
Phil Fasciana
Marco Martell
Fabian Aguirre

Rob Barrett
Dave Culross
David Kinkade
Derek Roddy

Studio albums

The Ten Commandments (1991)
Retribution (1992)
Stillborn (1993)
Eternal (1995)
In Cold Blood (1997)
The Fine Art of Murder (1998)
Envenomed (2000)
The Will to Kill (2002)
Warkult (2004)
Doomsday X (2007)
Invidious Dominion (2010)
Dead Man’s Path (2015)

Live albums

Conquering South America (2004)

Compilation albums

Joe Black (1996)
Manifestation (2000)

This 2000s death metal album–related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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도신

Zara Glover

Zara Giles (born Glover on 24 January 1982 in Preston in Lancashire), is one of England’s and the world’s leading Ten-pin bowlers. She is a world champion bowler and a bowling tutor for Brunswick Bowling Academies across Europe. She currently lives in Milton Keynes in Buckinghamshire. She is also one of the UKs top female ten-pin bowlers.
Zara’s Achievements

2007 World Ranking Masters Runner-up – Florida, U.S.
2006 San Marino Open Champion – 2nd Title defended successfully in 2006
2006 Indonesian Open Champion – Title defended successfully
2005 European Ladies Masters Champion, Barcelona
2005 San Marino Open Champion
2005 Indonesian Open Champion, Jakarta
2005 World Games Singles Silver Medallist – Müllheim, Germany
2004 World Tenpin Team Cup Gold Medallist – Hoofddorp, Netherlands
2004 European Tenpin Team Cup Gold Medallist – Norwich, England
2004 Oltremare Naples Champion, Italy
2003 World Tenpin Team Cup Gold Medallist – Odense, Denmark
2003 Singles, Doubles & All-events World Champion – Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
2002 World Youth Championships Team Gold Medallist – Pattaya, Thailand
2002 European Tenpin Team Cup Bronze Medallist – Müllheim, Germany
2001 Trios European Champion and Masters Silver Medallist, Aalborg, Denmark
2000 World Youth Championships Doubles Gold Medallist – Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
Numerous Youth Titles

Zara played in the 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007 World Tenpin Masters.
She has said that she really enjoyed it so kept pestering her parents to take her all the time. Zara’s nan bought her a bowling ball for Christmas that year and a Pro Shop operator recommended that she join the Youth Bowling Club so she went along on a Saturday morning and the rest was set in stone
Zara started playing in tournaments at the age of 12 and made the England youth team at 14 years old.
Her first tournament was in 1994 in the London Borough of Enfield with the National Association of Youth Bowling Clubs who hold a National Championship every year. It is said to now be the biggest tournament in Europe, running over 5 weekends.
External links[edit]

UKtenpin.com
Zara Glover’s Website
Industry profile of Zara Glover
UK’s premier bowling site
Brunswick Bowling
Super Series Profile
Glover covers the boys in Naples, Italy[permanent dead link]

This biographical article relating to a United Kingdom sportsperson is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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This biographical article relating to bowling is a stub. You can h
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Hip-O Records

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (February 2013) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Hip-O Records

Parent company
Universal Music Group

Founded
1996 (1996)

Founder
Doug Morris

Distributor(s)
Universal Music Enterprises (In the US)

Genre
Various

Country of origin
U.S.

Official website
www.hiporecords.com

Hip-O Records is a record label that specializes in reissues and compilations. It is part of Universal Music Group. Established in 1996, the label has distributed releases from ‘out of style’ genres such as disco and early hip-hop music as well as publishing film soundtracks.[1] The label’s name is a pun on the name ‘hippo’.

Contents

1 History
2 Hip-O Select
3 See also
4 References
5 External links

History[edit]
The name “Hip-O Records” is a play on the word “hip” and the already-existing Rhino Records. The formation of Hip-O Records has its roots in Universal Music Group Chairman & CEO Doug Morris’ relationship with Rhino. As co-Chairman of Atlantic Records during the early 1990s and then President & C.O.O. of Warner Music Group (U.S.), Morris observed Rhino’s great financial success at cross country rivals Capitol/EMI. EMI had taken an equity position in Rhino Records as an ideal two way relationship. Rhino provided invaluable assistance in the packaging and marketing of EMI’s catalog, and EMI provided Rhino with increasingly difficult to access master recordings. Their association had been extremely prestigious and profitable for both. During a 1992 renegotiation, Morris took a 50% stake in Rhino, which only energized the profitability and success of both.
Morris left Warner Music Group in 1995 during an internal shake-up and immediately landed at what was then called MCA Music Entertainment Group.[2] He recognized the history of the group’s labels provided a parallel opportunity to market the vintage catalog of masters, but Rhino’s magical executive team was tied up tight in the deal he signed with them at Atlantic. Morris launched his own catalog label that shadowed Rhino Records in every way, down to the company’s name.
Today, as part of Universal Music Group, Hip-O reissues many albums from UMG’s huge back catalogue – including such labels as Decca, Interscope, Geffen, A&M, Mercury, Polydor, MCA, Island and others.
Hip-O Select[edit]
H
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