Seeker (video network)

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Seeker is the education and documentary internet and app channel network under Discovery Digital Networks.
History[edit]
On March 3, 2015, Discovery Digital announced the launch of a digital network focusing on “adventurers, explorers, and storytellers on journeys – both physical and emotional – that celebrate the world around us” under the name Seeker.[1] The network was positioned alongside Discovery Digital’s other offerings: TestTube, SourceFed and Revision3, among others. A year after its launch, Seeker was reported to have close to 30 million views on its primary YouTube channel.[2]
In May 2016, Discovery Digital rolled out changes to its network lineup.[2] The TestTube channel – which had since been renamed to TestTube News – rebranded to Seeker Daily, a show that previously ran on the primary Seeker channel. The overall format of the TestTube News was said to be preserved, but the TestTube brand was phased out of existence.
References[edit]

^ “Discovery Introduces Seeker Network To Cater To Adventurous Spirits”. Tubefilter. 2015-03-03. Retrieved 2016-10-31. 
^ a b “Discovery Digital’s Redesigned Seeker Brand Is Now Live”. Tubefilter. 2016-05-25. Retrieved 2016-10-31. 

External links[edit]

Seeker.com

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Molecular Playground

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Molecular Playground displaying how Ritonavir binds to HIV-1 protease

Molecular Playground is a project initiated by researchers at University of Massachusetts Amherst whose goal is to expose the molecular aspect of nature to the public by the use of a system which displays interactive molecule simulations in public areas.
External links[edit]

Official project website

There are Molecular Playground installations at:

University of Massachusetts Amherst, Integrated Sciences Building – Amherst, MA 01003, USA.
The Springfield Science Museum – Springfield, MA 01103, USA.
St. Olaf College, Regents Hall of Natural and Mathematical Sciences – Northfield, MN 55057, USA.
Okinawa Institute of Science & Technology – Onna-son, Kunigami-gun, Okinawa, Japan.
Gilead Sciences Inc. – Foster City, CA 94404, USA.
University of Alcalá, School of Pharmacy – 28806 Alcalá de Henares (Madrid), Spain.

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물방

Cambridge Lawns

Cambridge Lawns is a residential neighborhood of single-family homes near the University of Miami and joined by proximity and a common front onto tree-lined Broad Canal [1] (a.k.a. Brewer Canal), a waterway of the City of South Miami in Miami-Dade County, Florida.
The neighborhood includes the Cambridge Lawns Historic District [2] and adjacent homes in the Cambridge Lawns subdivision and is generally defined on the west by Brewer Park [3] and the widening of the Broad Canal, also known as Brewer Canal; on the east by SW 60th Avenue; on the north by Miller Drive; and, on the south by SW 58th Street to the west of 62nd Avenue and the Broad Canal to the east of 62nd Avenue.[4]
Originally developed in the mid-1920s just 0.7 miles from the newly chartered University of Miami, the Cambridge Lawns neighborhood was given a ‘university’ theme from the outset by developers. With the college lawns and riverside parks at Cambridge University in England in mind, developers projected a waterfront park and tree-lined canal with adjacent suburban lawns, while the neighborhood’s first street names were dubbed in honor of well-known U.S. universities—SW 57th Street was then called “Harvard Avenue,” for example, while SW 57th Drive was “Princeton Boulevard” and SW 58th Street was originally named “Clemson Avenue.”[5]
By 1928, developers had completed 30 of the first homes in the neighborhood’s signature Tudor Revival (or Mock Tudor) and Mediterranean Revival Style architecture, marking what today is known as the Cambridge Lawns Historic District. These homes, which received their historic designation in 2005, are still referred to by many as “cottages,” owing to their modest lot and construction size. The Tudor Revival homes are generally 1½ stories, noteworthy for their gabled facades and chimneys, while the Mediterranean Revival homes have textured or smooth stucco surfaces, ornamental window and door frames and barrel-tile roofs.
The Great Miami Hurricane of 1926 brought an end to the 1920s South Florida real estate boom, while the Great Depression and World War II would keep the local real estate market depressed for more than two decades. The post-war return to prosperity saw student enrollment at the University of Miami climb above 10,000 and with the area ripe for new homes for professors, administrative staff and baby-boom families, developers launched a second phase of homebuilding on larger lots in the Cambridge Lawns subdivision to the south of Broa
초대남

Chris Johns (photographer)

Chris Johns (born April 15, 1951)[1] is a photographer who was the editor-in-chief for National Geographic Magazine from January 2005 to April 2014. After a reorganization, in April 2014, Johns was named chief content officer of National Geographic Magazine.[2] He spent many years in Africa for the magazine and is the first photographer to have been named its editor-in-chief. He started his journalism career at daily newspapers.
Biography[edit]
Born in Medford, Oregon, Johns studied technical journalism at Oregon State University and photojournalism at the University of Minnesota.[3] Johns began his photography career as a staff member at The Topeka Capital-Journal (where he and Gerald Ford’s daughter Susan Ford were the paper’s two interns in 1975).[4] He was named Newspaper Photographer of the Year by the National Press Photographers Association in 1979 at age 28, and became a staff photographer at the Seattle Times in 1980.[5] After joining National Geographic, he contributed extensively, shooting two cover articles before becoming an editor.
Johns has photographed extensively in Africa. The foreword to Johns’ photography book Valley of Life: Africa’s Great Rift was written by Nelson Mandela.
Johns was named Editor of the Year in October 2008 by Advertising Age magazine at the American Magazine Conference. During his tenure as its editor-in-chief, National Geographic twice received the General Excellence prize in the National Magazine Awards (in 2007 and 2008).[6]
Johns was awarded an Honorary Doctorate from Indiana University Bloomington in 2009.
He lives in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia with his wife Elizabeth, his daughters Noel and Louise, and his son Tim.
References[edit]

^ Murg, Stephanie (April 30, 2008). “ELLIES 2008: SO WHAT DO YOU DO, CHRIS JOHNS, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF OF NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC?”. Mediabistro. Retrieved December 25, 2014. 
^ http://press.nationalgeographic.com/2014/04/30/reorganizes-publishing-television-operations-new-roles-chief-content-officer/
^ Nation Geographic. “Photography Chris Johns”. photography.nationalgeographic.com. Nation Geographic. Retrieved 4 March 2016. 
^ Ford’s daughter Susan interned at C-J – Topeka Capital-Journal – December 28, 2006
^ Garlock, David (2003). Pulitzer Prize Feature Stories: America’s Best Writing, 1978-2003. Ames, Iowa: Iowa State Press. p. 180. ISBN 0-8138-2545-8. 
^ “National Geographic Wins 3 Awards, Honored Beyond Photography” (New York Times, May 2, 2008).

봉지닷컴

Chuta Formation

Chuta Formation
Stratigraphic range: Cretaceous

Type
Formation

Location

Country
Mexico

The Chuta Formation is a geologic formation in Mexico. It preserves fossils dating back to the Cretaceous period.
See also[edit]

Earth sciences portal
Mexico portal
Paleontology portal
Cretaceous portal
Mesozoic portal

List of fossiliferous stratigraphic units in Mexico

References[edit]

Various Contributors to the Paleobiology Database. “Fossilworks: Gateway to the Paleobiology Database”. Retrieved 8 July 2014. 

This article about a specific stratigraphic formation in Mexico is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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미소넷

South American Basketball Championship for Women

South American Basketball Championship for Women

Most recent season or competition:
2016 South American Basketball Championship for Women

Sport
Basketball

Founded
1946

Inaugural season
1946

No. of teams
10

Country
South America

Continent
South America

Most recent
champion(s)
 Brazil

Most titles
 Brazil (26)

Related
competitions
FIBA Americas Championship for Women

Official website
Fibaamericas.com

South American Basketball Championship for Women was first played in 1946.[1] Female teams from South America take part in this tournament, which often has been played biannually.

Contents

1 Summaries
2 Performances by nation
3 See also
4 References
5 External links

Summaries[edit]

Year
Host
Gold
Silver
Bronze

1946
 Chile (Santiago)
 Chile
 Brazil
 Argentina

1948
 Argentina (Buenos Aires)
 Argentina
 Chile
 Peru

1950
 Peru (Lima)
 Chile
 Argentina
 Peru

1952
 Paraguay (Asunción)
 Paraguay
 Brazil
 Chile

1954
 Brazil (São Paulo)
 Brazil
 Chile
 Ecuador

1956
 Ecuador (Quito)
 Chile
 Paraguay
 Brazil

1958
 Peru (Lima)
 Brazil
 Argentina
 Paraguay

1960
 Chile (Santiago)
 Chile
 Brazil
 Peru

1962
 Paraguay (Asunción)
 Paraguay
 Chile
 Brazil

1965
 Brazil (Rio de Janeiro)
 Brazil
 Paraguay
 Peru

1967
 Colombia (Cali)
 Brazil
 Chile
 Peru

1968
 Chile (Santiago)
 Brazil
 Chile
 Argentina

1970
 Ecuador (Guayaquil)
 Brazil
 Argentina
 Ecuador

1972
 Peru (Lima)
 Brazil
 Peru
 Paraguay

1974
 Bolivia (La Paz)
 Brazil
 Argentina
 Bolivia

1977
 Peru (Lima)
 Peru
 Brazil
 Argentina

1978
 Bolivia (La Paz)
 Brazil
 Bolivia
 Argentina

1981
 Peru (Lima)
 Brazil
 Peru
 Colombia

1984
 Colombia (Cúcuta)
 Colombia
 Brazil
 Peru

1986
 Brazil (Guaratinguetá)
 Brazil
 Peru
 Colombia

1989
 Chile (Santiago)
 Brazil
 Peru
 Argentina

1991
 Colombia (Bogotá)
 Brazil
 Colombia
 Argentina

1993
 Bolivia (Cochabamba)
 Brazil
 Argentina
 Chile

1995
 Brazil (Jacareí)
 Brazil
 Argentina
 Chile

1997
 Chile (Iquique)
 Brazi
입싸

Parachela maculicauda

Parachela maculicauda

Conservation status

Least Concern (IUCN 3.1)

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Animalia

Phylum:
Chordata

Class:
Actinopterygii

Order:
Cypriniformes

Family:
Cyprinidae

Genus:
Parachela

Species:
P. maculicauda

Binomial name

Parachela maculicauda
(Smith, 1934)

Parachela maculicauda is a freshwater fish in the genus Parachela, family Cyprinidae and order Cypriniformes. It occurs in lowland rivers and swamps in small groups. Found at the water surface in small and medium-sized rivers with nearby areas of floodplain forest. Feeds on plankton.[1]
References[edit]

^ Rainboth, Walter J. Fishes of the Cambodian Mekong. Food & Agriculture Org., 1996.

This Cyprinidae-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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우리넷

John L. Withrow

John Withrow

John Lindsay Withrow (1837–1909) was a Presbyterian minister and theologian.

Contents

1 Early life and education
2 Career
3 Works
4 References

Early life and education[edit]
Withrow was born in Coatesville, Pennsylvania in 1837 to John Mitchell Withrow and Keziah Withrow. As a youth, Withrow studied at Tuscarora Academy and Media Classical Institute. Withrow graduated from Princeton University in 1860 and Princeton Theological Seminary in 1863. He married Anna Judson Hinckel the same year. Withrow later received a D.D. from Lafayette College in 1872 and a LL.D. from Knox College in 1896.
Career[edit]
Withrow served successively as pastor of Abington, Pennsylvania’s Arch Street Church, Park Street Church in Boston, Massachusetts and Third Presbyterian Church in Chicago for about twelve years. In 1898 Withrow returned to Park Street Church, serving as pastor until 1907. Withrow handpicked Arcturus Conrad as his successor at Park Street, and they served together until Withrow’s death.[1]
Withrow also served as Moderator of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in 1896. He served as President of the Chicago’s Presbyterian Hospital while residing in that city.
Withrow died in Brookline, Massachusetts of paresis and was buried in Mount Auburn Cemetery. He published various works and sermons.[2][3]
Works[edit]

“The leading nation: A sermon in behalf of the American Home Missionary Society,” preached in the Broadway Tabernacle Church, New York, May 4, 1879
“The hour for Africa.”: An address delivered before the American Colonization Society, January 18, 1881
“The condition of the heathen and their conversion:” a sermon before the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions at the seventy-seventh annual meeting, held at Des Moines, Iowa, October 5, 1886

References[edit]

^ Garth M. Rosell, Boston’s Historic Park Street Church: The Story of an Evangelical Landmark (Kregel Publications, 2009)
^ Who’s who in America, Volume 2, edited by John William Leonard, Albert Nelson Marquis
^ The Princeton Seminary bulletin: Supplementary issue, Volumes 3-5, Princeton Theological Seminary (1909)

엠팍

The First Session

The First Session

EP by Hole

Released
August 26, 1997 (1997-08-26)

Recorded
March 17, 1990 (1990-03-17) at Rudy’s Rising Star in Los Angeles, California

Genre
Alternative rock, noise rock

Length
12:55

Label
Sympathy for the Record Industry

Producer
James Moreland, Eric Erlandson

Hole chronology

Ask for It
(1995)
The First Session
(1997)
My Body, the Hand Grenade
(1997)

The First Session is an EP by American alternative rock band Hole, released on August 26, 1997 on Sympathy for the Record Industry. The EP features the entire recording of the band’s first ever studio session on March 17, 1990 and also a twenty-page booklet focusing on the band’s early career prior to the release of their debut studio album, Pretty on the Inside (1991). The EP marked Hole’s final release on Sympathy for the Record Industry.

Contents

1 Background
2 Recording
3 Packaging
4 Release
5 Track listing
6 Personnel
7 See also
8 References

Background[edit]
Hole in mid-1989 after lead guitarist Eric Erlandson replied to an advertisement, placed by frontwoman Courtney Love, in the Los Angeles-based punk rock fanzine The Reycler. The band’s first rehearsal took place in Fortress Studios in Hollywood, where Love, Erlandson and original bassist Lisa Roberts “played something noisy” while “they [Courtney and Lisa] started screaming their poetry at the top of their lungs for two or three hours.”[1] Drummer Caroline Rue and a third guitarist, Mike Geisbrecht were then recruited and the band began performing shows in October 1989. Songs that would be later featured on The First Session were played at these series of live shows. Before Hole began to develop a fanbase, Geisbrecht left and was replaced briefly by Errol Stewart, who also left a few weeks later. Roberts also left the group at some point in early 1990 and was replaced by Jill Emery on bass.
Recording[edit]
In March 1990, Hole were given a budget of $500 by Sympathy for the Record Industry’s president Long Gone John for a studio recording session, which was initially meant to include only “Retard Girl.”[2] The allocated studio was known as Rudy’s Rising Star, which Hole later described as “a tiny LA basement studio,”[3] and the recording session took place on March 17, 1990.[4]
“Turpentine” was recorded first, followed by “Phonebill Song” and “Retard Girl.”[5] The final song, “Johnnie’s in the Bathroom,” was an avant garde-inspired noise jam and included segments of
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