The Arm Behind the Army

The Arm Behind the Army

Distributed by
U.S. Army Signal Corps

Release date

1942 (1942)

Running time

10 minutes

Country
United States

Language
English

The Arm Behind the Army is a propaganda film produced by the US Army Signal Corps in 1942 to encourage the home front to participate in war production.
The film begins with a short outline of American military history, noting that each war has advanced military technology a little further, from the muskets of 1776, to the tanks and airplanes of the First World War. The various arms of the US Army are introduced: infantry, artillery, air corps, signal corps. These are Uncle Sam’s fist, the narrator notes, and behind it is American labor “Uncle Sam’s muscle” the arm behind the army.
The narrator notes “Behind the desks, behind the drawing board, behind the benches, on the assembly lines, American industry is making the greatest production effort in history to supply our armed forces with the weapons of war.”
The film briefly explains how dissention among Austrian and Czech management and labor led to the ruin of both, and how French factories were left idle while France fell. It noted the terrible working conditions in Axis-occupied territory, the coerced labor, the ending of old-age benefits, unions and “all the advances that labor every made.” The film ends with a picture of a soldier and a picture of an industrial worker superimposed on a battlefield, noting that wherever the soldier is, the worker is there too.
See also[edit]

List of American films of 1942
List of Allied Propaganda Films of World War 2
United States home front during World War II

External links[edit]

Complete film at archive.org
The Arm Behind the Army at the Internet Movie Database

This article about a war film is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v
t
e

일본야동

Ergometrine

Ergometrine

Clinical data

AHFS/Drugs.com
Monograph

Pregnancy
category

X

Routes of
administration
by mouth

ATC code
G02AB03 (WHO)

Legal status

Legal status

CA: Schedule VI
List I precursor (US)

Pharmacokinetic data

Metabolism
Liver (partly CYP3A4)

Biological half-life
2-phase (10 min; 2 hrs)

Excretion
Biliary

Identifiers

IUPAC name

(6aR,9R)-N-((S)-1-Hydroxypropan- 2-yl)-7-methyl-4,6,6a,7,8,9-hexahydroindolo[4,3-fg]quinoline-9-carboxamide

Synonyms
Ergonovine, d-lysergic acid beta-propanolamide

CAS Number
60-79-7 Y

PubChem (CID)
443884

IUPHAR/BPS
148

DrugBank
DB01253 Y

ChemSpider
391970 Y

UNII
WH41D8433D Y

KEGG
D07905 Y

ChEBI
CHEBI:4822 Y

ChEMBL
CHEMBL119443 Y

ECHA InfoCard
100.000.441

Chemical and physical data

Formula
C19H23N3O2

Molar mass
325.41 g/mol

3D model (Jmol)
Interactive image

SMILES

O=C(N[C@@H](C)CO)[C@@H]3/C=C2/c4cccc1c4c(cn1)C[[email protected]]2N(C3)C

InChI

InChI=1S/C19H23N3O2/c1-11(10-23)21-19(24)13-6-15-14-4-3-5-16-18(14)12(8-20-16)7-17(15)22(2)9-13/h3-6,8,11,13,17,20,23H,7,9-10H2,1-2H3,(H,21,24)/t11-,13+,17+/m0/s1 Y

Key:WVVSZNPYNCNODU-XTQGRXLLSA-N Y

  (verify)

Ergometrine also known as ergonovine, is a medication used to cause contractions of the uterus to treat heavy vaginal bleeding after childbirth.[1] It can be used either by mouth, by injection into a muscle, or injection into a vein. It begins working within 15 min when taken by mouth and is faster in onset when used by injection. Effects last between 45 and 180 minutes.[1]
Common side effect include high blood pressure, vomiting, seizures, headache, and low blood pressure. Other serious side effects include ergotism.[1] It was originally made from the rye ergot fungus but can also be made from lysergic acid.[2][3] Due to it being possible to make lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) from ergometrine it is regulated.[4]
Ergometrine was discovered in 1932.[2] It is on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[5] The wholesale cost in the developing world is between 0.12 and 0.41 USD for an injectable dose and 0.01 USD for a pill as of 2014.[6][7] In the United States it is about 1.75 USD per dose.[1]

Contents

1 Medical use
2 Side effects
3 Mechanism of action
4 History
5 Legal status
6 See also
7 References

Medical use[edit]
It has a medical use in obs
써니넷

Seeker (video network)

The topic of this article may not meet Wikipedia’s general notability guideline. Please help to establish notability by citing reliable secondary sources that are independent of the topic and provide significant coverage of it beyond its mere trivial mention. If notability cannot be established, the article is likely to be merged, redirected, or deleted.
Find sources: ”Seeker” video network – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR · free images (December 2016) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Seeker is the education and documentary internet and app channel network under Discovery Digital Networks.
History[edit]
On March 3, 2015, Discovery Digital announced the launch of a digital network focusing on “adventurers, explorers, and storytellers on journeys – both physical and emotional – that celebrate the world around us” under the name Seeker.[1] The network was positioned alongside Discovery Digital’s other offerings: TestTube, SourceFed and Revision3, among others. A year after its launch, Seeker was reported to have close to 30 million views on its primary YouTube channel.[2]
In May 2016, Discovery Digital rolled out changes to its network lineup.[2] The TestTube channel – which had since been renamed to TestTube News – rebranded to Seeker Daily, a show that previously ran on the primary Seeker channel. The overall format of the TestTube News was said to be preserved, but the TestTube brand was phased out of existence.
References[edit]

^ “Discovery Introduces Seeker Network To Cater To Adventurous Spirits”. Tubefilter. 2015-03-03. Retrieved 2016-10-31. 
^ a b “Discovery Digital’s Redesigned Seeker Brand Is Now Live”. Tubefilter. 2016-05-25. Retrieved 2016-10-31. 

External links[edit]

Seeker.com

서양야동

Molecular Playground

This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. (Learn how and when to remove these template messages)

This article is an orphan, as no other articles link to it. Please introduce links to this page from related articles; try the Find link tool for suggestions. (February 2013)

The topic of this article may not meet Wikipedia’s general notability guideline. Please help to establish notability by citing reliable secondary sources that are independent of the topic and provide significant coverage of it beyond its mere trivial mention. If notability cannot be established, the article is likely to be merged, redirected, or deleted.
Find sources: ”Molecular Playground” – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR · free images (December 2012) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

(Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Molecular Playground displaying how Ritonavir binds to HIV-1 protease

Molecular Playground is a project initiated by researchers at University of Massachusetts Amherst whose goal is to expose the molecular aspect of nature to the public by the use of a system which displays interactive molecule simulations in public areas.
External links[edit]

Official project website

There are Molecular Playground installations at:

University of Massachusetts Amherst, Integrated Sciences Building – Amherst, MA 01003, USA.
The Springfield Science Museum – Springfield, MA 01103, USA.
St. Olaf College, Regents Hall of Natural and Mathematical Sciences – Northfield, MN 55057, USA.
Okinawa Institute of Science & Technology – Onna-son, Kunigami-gun, Okinawa, Japan.
Gilead Sciences Inc. – Foster City, CA 94404, USA.
University of Alcalá, School of Pharmacy – 28806 Alcalá de Henares (Madrid), Spain.

This article relating to education in the United States is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v
t
e

물방

Reluciente, Rechinante y Aterciopelado

Reluciente, Rechinante y Aterciopelado

Live album by Aterciopelados

Released
April 22, 2016

Genre
Rock en español

Length
46:21

Label
Sony Music

Producer
Rafael Arcaurte

Aterciopelados chronology

Rio
(2008)
Reluciente, Rechinante y Aterciopelado
(2016)

Singles from Reluciente, Rechinante y Aterciopelado

“Luz Azul”
Released: October 16, 2015
“Florecita Rockera”
Released: March 8, 2016
“Maligno”
Released: July 13, 2016

Reluciente, Rechinante y Aterciopelado is the first live album by Colombian band Aterciopelados. It was recorded before a live audience of 140 guests in Bogotá, Colombia, on June 2, 2015 and released as a CD and DVD on April 22, 2016.[1][2] Directed by Roberto de Zubiría and produced by Rafael Arcaurte the album includes featured performances by León Larregui, Spanish singer Macaco, Goyo (ChocQuibTown) and Catalina García (Monsieur Perine).
The proposal to record a concert film was came from Sony Music Colombia after the band’s comeback concert at Rock al Parque 2014. After almost two months of rehearsals the concert was recorded. The album contains songs from their previous albums El Dorado, La Pipa de la Paz, Caribe Atómico and Gozo Poderoso as well as songs from solo projects by the members of the band.[3]

Contents

1 Recording and scenery
2 Track listing
3 Personnel
4 References
5 External links

Recording and scenery[edit]
The musical pre-production was carried out in Tigo Music Studios by Audiovisión, the studio where the band recorded some of their most well-known works. The concert took place in RTI studios, which was illuminated with lamps made out of 810 bottles of detergent and softeners, a large velvet heart, a tree made of tires and plastic caps, and CDs that served as a framework on the steps. Juan Garces was in charge of the scenery.
The recording consisted of two sessions totaling approximately three hours. The first, beginning with Baracunatana, included El Estuche, El Álbum and Rompecabezas. They then go ahead into a couple solo songs, Soy La Semilla Nativa from Niños Cristal by Buitrago and Yo, one of the most glittering successes from the album Dos by Echeverri. The second session contains an unreleased track called Re which is a tribute to the Mexican band Café Tacuba. It consists of sets of words with the “Re” syllable and a Norteño melody. For the interpretation of Maligno, León Larregui of the band Zoé and Colombian bandoneon player Giovanni Parra were invited t
오야넷

Botswana at the 1982 Commonwealth Games

Botswana at the
1982 Commonwealth Games

CGF code
BOT

CGA
Botswana National Olympic Committee

Website
bnoc.org.bw

in Brisbane, Australia

Medals

Gold
Silver
Bronze
Total

0
0
0
0

Commonwealth Games appearances (overview)

British Commonwealth Games

1974

Commonwealth Games

1978
1982
1986
1990
1994
1998
2002
2006
2010
2014

Botswana competed in the 1982 Commonwealth Games. They sent athletes in two sports.
Athletics[edit]

Men’s 200 metres

Pius Kgannyeng
Shepherd Mogapi

Men’s 400 metres

Pius Kgannyeng
Joseph Ramotshabi

Men’s 800 metres

Temba Mpofu
Joseph Ramotshabi

Men’s 4×400 metre relay

Pius Kgannyeng
Shepherd Mogapi
Temba Mpofu
Joseph Ramotshabi

Men’s Marathon

Wilson Theleso

Lawn Bowls[edit]

Men’s Doubles

Men’s Fours

Men’s Singles

Women’s Triples

Sources[edit]

Official results by country

v
t
e

Associations at the 1982 Commonwealth Games

Australia
Bahamas
Barbados
Bermuda
Botswana
Canada
Cayman Islands
Cyprus
England
Falkland Islands
Fiji
The Gambia
Ghana
Gibraltar
Guernsey
Guyana
Hong Kong
India
Isle of Man
Jamaica
Jersey
Kenya
Malaŵi
Malaysia
Malta
Mauritius
New Zealand
Nigeria
Northern Ireland
Papua New Guinea
St Helena
Scotland
Singapore
Solomon Islands
Sri Lanka
Swaziland
Tanzania
Tonga
Trinidad and Tobago
Uganda
Vanuatu
Wales
Western Samoa
Zambia
Zimbabwe

v
t
e

Botswana at the Commonwealth Games

British Commonwealth Games

1974

Commonwealth Games

1978
1982
1986
1990
1994
1998
2002
2006
2010
2014

This article about sports in Botswana is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v
t
e

현자타임

John Hughes (British diplomat)

For other people with this name, see John Hughes.
Dr. Edgar John Hughes (born 27 July 1947) is a British diplomat, the former British Ambassador to Argentina.[1]
Born in South Wales, Hughes went to the London School of Economics. He went on to receive his masters degree from Lehigh University in Pennsylvania and his PhD from Pembroke College, Cambridge in 1974 with a thesis entitled Anglo-american relations and the formation of the United Nations organisation.
Hughes joined the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in 1973, and has since specialised primarily in American affairs, serving in Santiago, Chile; in Washington, D.C., in the United States; and in Oslo, Norway.
In 2000, Hughes was appointed HM Ambassador to Caracas (Venezuela), where he served until 2003. He was then appointed HM Ambassador to Buenos Aires (Argentina) in 2004, and in 2005 as concurrent non-resident HM Ambassador to Asunción (Paraguay).
Hughes is married to Lynne Evans, by whom he has two children, Owain and Alexander.
References[edit]

^ CV – http://ukinargentina.fco.gov.uk/en/our-offices-in-argentina/our-ambassador/

Diplomatic posts

Preceded by
Richard Denys Wilkinson
British Ambassador to Venezuela
2000–2003
Succeeded by
Donald Lamont

Preceded by
Sir Robin Christopher
British Ambassador to Argentina
2004–2008
Succeeded by
Shan Morgan

Preceded by
Unknown
British Ambassador to Paraguaynon-resident
2005–2008
Succeeded by
Shan Morgan

Authority control

WorldCat Identities
VIAF: 46651212
LCCN: nr95012136

This British diplomat-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v
t
e

토렌트

Miguel Piernavieja del Pozo

Miguel Piernavieja del Pozo

This name uses Spanish naming customs: the first or paternal family name is Piernavieja and the second or maternal family name is del Pozo.
Miguel Piernavieja del Pozo (21 May 1916 – 8 June 1983)[1] was a Spanish spy for Nazi Germany, operating in Britain during the Second World War. He was quickly spotted by the British security services who gave him the codename “Pogo” and used one of their double-agents to feed him disinformation which was relayed to the Germans.

Contents

1 Spanish Civil War
2 Spying in Britain
3 War service
4 Selected publications
5 References
6 External links

Spanish Civil War[edit]
Born in Santa Cruz de Tenerife on 21 May 1916,[1] Piernavieja del Pozo was a Falangist who had worked for Franco during the Spanish Civil War.[2][3]
Spying in Britain[edit]
In 1940,[4] the British Embassy in Madrid, with the personal recommendation of British ambassador Samuel Hoare, arranged for Piernavieja del Pozo to travel to Britain as an observer for a Madrid-based study group.[5][6] He arrived in Britain on 29 September 1940.[2][7] Piernavieja del Pozo was contacted by Gwylm Williams, who had tried to work for the Germans in 1939 but had been recruited as a double-agent by MI5 instead.[8][9] Williams posed as an ardent Welsh nationalist and Piernavieja del Pozo gave him £3900 (a sum more than 10x the average annual wage[10]) in a talcum-powder tin and asked him to obtain information on the Welsh nationalist movement and on factories making munitions in the west of England. According to Williams, Pozo had asked him to make plans for sabotage.[2]
War service[edit]
Piernavieja del Pozo was awarded the Iron Cross for his military service in the Division Azul on the Eastern Front.[8] He returned to Spain in January 1941.[7]
Selected publications[edit]

El Deporte en la Literatura Latina. Madrid, 1960.

References[edit]

^ a b Real Academia de la Historia. Diccionario Biográfico Español. Retrieved 10 January 2015. Santa Cruz de Tenerife 21.V.1916 – Madrid 8.VI.1983 
^ a b c Burns, Jimmy (2011). Papa Spy: A True Story of Love, Wartime Espionage in Madrid, and the Treachery of the Cambridge Spies. London: Bloomsbury. p. 177. ISBN 978-1-4088-2773-4. 
^ Oppenheimer, Walter (1 November 2009). “Anacletos de Franco”. El País. Retrieved 10 January 2015. 
^ “MI5 found dissolute Spaniard all too easy to deceive.” David Sanderson, The Times, 24 October 2014. Retrieved 10 January 2015. (
웹툰

Sanford and Son Theme (The Streetbeater)

“Sanford and Son Theme (The Streetbeater)”

1973 7″ vinyl single (US)

Single by Quincy Jones

from the album ‘You’ve Got It Bad, Girl’

Released
1973

Recorded
1972

Genre
Electric blues, funk

Length
3:06
0:51 (Theme song version)

Label
A&M

Writer(s)
Quincy Jones

Producer(s)
Quincy Jones

“Sanford and Son Theme (The Streetbeater)” is the theme to the 1970s situation comedy Sanford and Son. It was composed by Quincy Jones.
Overview[edit]
The Streetbeater was first released by A&M Records on Jones’ 1973 album You’ve Got It Bad Girl and as a single from that album.[1][2] It is also featured on his Greatest Hits album.
Although the song itself only reached #294 and did not reach Billboard status for that year, it has maintained mainstream popularity, ranking 9th in a Rolling Stone Reader Poll of Television Themes Songs [3]
Other recordings[edit]
Harry James recorded a version in 1979 on his album Still Harry After All These Years (Sheffield Lab LAB 11).
References[edit]

^ “Sanford & Son Theme (The Streetbeater) by Quincy Jones : Reviews and Ratings”. Rate Your Music. 2010-09-27. Retrieved 2013-07-24. 
^ “Manhattan by Quincy Jones @ARTISTdirect”. Artistdirect.com. Retrieved 2013-07-24. 
^ “Readers Poll: The Best Television Theme Songs Pictures – 9. Sanford and Son – ‘The Streetbeater'”. Rolling Stone. 2011. Retrieved 2013-07-24. 

19다모아